Discovered Artists

Throughout my time in Chicago I adventured, discovered, and learned a lot about the art world in a big city. The learned about and was exposed to the different ways in which art can be displayed, different styles of art, different people who view art, the different ways to view art, the different meanings art can hold, and the different powers that artists and viewers have to give art context. In this tab I focus on three very different artist that I discovered while in the Windy City.

Pissarro and his wife

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Camille Pissarro (1830- 1903)

Pissarro was a French Impressionist and Noe-Impressionist painter. He is famous for being the only known artist who made substantial contributions to both movements. He has been named the ‘Father of Impressionism’ and greatly influenced Post-Impressionists artists like Cezanne, Renoir, Van Gogh and Gauguin.

I found his works interesting because of the realistic feeling they portray. None of his works are abstract, but to me they all have symbolism and send a message even though it might be hidden under tranquil trees or beautiful meadows. I like the natural color schemes and the everyday subjects he paints. In my own work, I like to capture normal activities and normal objects. I like to find the beauty in everyday things and Pissarro does that too. I was also very surprised that I had not heard of his name or work before this. I feel I have been exposed to many artist and as soon as I began viewing more of Pissarro’s work I knew I must learn more about him. Here are some of his works.    Here are some of the websites I visited to find out more about this artist: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camille_Pissarro, http://www.pissarro.vi/artist.htm, http://www.camillepissarro.org/, http://www.camille-pissarro.org/, http://www.abcgallery.com/P/pissaro/pissaro.html

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Philip Pearlstein (1924)

Pearlstein working on a painting

Pearlstein is an American contemporary realistic painter who helped to revitalize the realist painting movement by focusing on people in the nude. He was a close friend with Andy Warhol and the two often inspired each other.  Before his realistic paintings, he often made abstract expressionist landscapes. His paintings can be found all over the world.

I found his work interesting because of the realistic looking subjects and images, but the fact that the compositions in which they were arranged were abnormal. I also liked how the people in the paintings are nude. It shows the rawness and realness of the human body. And lastly I enjoy how the subjects look as if they don’t know that they are being painted, but yet it is obvious that they are. Pearlstein’s pieces give me a strength to be comfortable with myself and the human body. Below are some examples of Pearlstein’s art works.

Here are some of the website I visited to find out more about Pearlstein: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Pearlstein, http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/p/pearlstein_philip/index.html, http://www.artnet.com/artists/philip-pearlstein/, http://www.artchive.com/artchive/P/pearlstein.html

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Botero himself

Fernando Botero (1932)

Botero is a proud world-recognized Colombian artist who paints, draws, and sculpts. He travels often and has created his works from all over the globe. Botero generally works with still lives and landscapes.

I picked Botero to research because of his expression style. He seems to exaggerate the size of his subjects, which are mostly women. He makes the females and the environment around them into colorful cartoons adding curves and an organic feel to his pieces. I like this bulbous imagery because it takes a once negative idea, to be fat, and turns makes it beautiful. Botero transforms these women into goddesses with all their naked skin folds. From these works I, as a woman, feel empowered. Below are some examples of his work.   

Below are a few of the website I looked through in order to gather information of Botero: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernando_Botero, http://www.fernando-botero.com/, http://www.museumsyndicate.com/artist.php?artist=248, http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/botero.html

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